The battery status is indicated by an ultrasonic wave – Enerzine

As we become more dependent on electronic devices and electric vehicles, the health and longevity of the batteries that power them have become a major concern. To this end, English mechanical engineers have developed a new method for determining the internal structure and health assessment of batteries, a discovery that could have significant implications for the electronics and automotive industries.

This technique could help detect battery problems much earlier, before they reach the point where they can no longer be repaired. This could help extend their lifecycle, reduce e-waste and the demand for new batteries that use critical raw materials.

The new method could help manufacturers detect battery defects during production – reducing the number of faulty batteries reaching consumers – and could be used during maintenance to provide a more accurate health assessment of a battery.

A promising advance for the industry

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have developed the technique, which uses a single ultrasound wave Rebuild a lithium-ion battery cell for the first time. Lithium-ion batteries are used in electronic devices such as cell phones and laptops and are also used to power electric vehicles.

Currently, the primary method for accurately assessing the internal health of a lithium-ion battery is to use: X-ray machine, which is costly and inconvenient for companies, manufacturers and consumers. This means that faults can be overlooked and only detected when the battery shows visible damage, such as: B. Swelling, which is often the case when the battery can no longer be repaired.

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Sheffield’s discovery points to a promising direction in the development of a new, inexpensive but effective system for assessing the health of lithium-ion batteries, although it is still at an early stage and requires further development to be widely available to the industry to be.

The technology also opens up the possibility of developing small sensors that could be installed on the battery to monitor its condition in real time. This could be a significant development for monitoring the health of batteries in electric vehicles, but could also be developed for use in smaller electronic devices such as laptops and cell phones.

For better understanding

What is the new method for assessing battery health?

This is a technique developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield that uses a single ultrasonic wave to rebuild a lithium-ion battery cell.

What are the advantages of this method?

This could help detect battery problems earlier, extend their lifecycle, reduce e-waste and reduce demand for new batteries.

It could be used by manufacturers to detect battery defects during production and maintenance, enabling a more accurate assessment of a battery’s condition.

What are the challenges of this method?

It is still in its early stages and needs further development to be widely available to the industry.

What future implications does this method have?

It opens the possibility of developing small sensors for real-time monitoring of battery health, which could be important for electric vehicles and smaller electronic devices.

References

The study, titled “Predicting the internal structure of a lithium-ion battery using a single ultrasonic wave response,” was published in the Journal of Energy Storage. Article access.

Article: “Predicting the internal structure of a lithium-ion battery using a single ultrasonic wave response” – DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2023.108778

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