“Of course I can’t do it”: On strike, a teacher makes Doordash deliveries to make ends meet

With no pay, striking teachers are forced to find second jobs, including a Quebec teacher, a single parent of three teenagers who makes Doordash deliveries to make ends meet while also launching initiatives to help them to help reproduce.

• Also read: Public Sector Strike: The Common Front takes stock at 11am.

• Also read: The strike that was the last straw for this teacher who wants to resign from her position

• Also read: Unlimited general strike: teachers receive $102,000, recalls minister Bernard Drainville

Kindergarten teacher Julie-Caroline Dumont has had to find a second job and has been without pay since the Autonomous Education Federation’s (FAE) indefinite general strike began on Thursday.

This Quebec teacher, who has 23 years of professional experience, now makes restaurant deliveries every day outside of her strike hours and on weekends, even though she knows this extra income won’t be enough to pay for groceries, car and mortgage.

“Of course I won’t make it,” she says.

  • Listen to the interview with Mélanie Hubert, President of the Autonomous Education Federation (FAE), on Alexandre Dubé’s show QUB radio:

support group

Ms. Dumont never thought she would have to ask for help to get her needs met, but that’s exactly what she decided to do this weekend. A post in a support group for striking teachers allowed him to quickly find a winter coat for one of his teenagers.

Marjorie Guilbault created this Facebook group at the end of last week to help colleagues who are in financial difficulty, explains the teacher from Montérégie, who is currently not on strike because she is represented by the Common Front.

With the help of another striking teacher, Geneviève Groleau, the group’s two administrators were able to raise around $1,000 in donations in 24 hours, which has helped at least twenty teachers so far.

“There are stories that give you goosebumps. There are people who are going through divorce, others who are experiencing grief… We bring them together with people who want to help, there are many who raise their hands. We feel the support of the population,” says Ms. Groleau, stating that she has not received any negative comments about this initiative on social networks.

The FAE also published yesterday the results of a Léger poll conducted last week, which shows that the population strongly supports teachers’ demands for services for struggling students.

For the strike

Even though they are in a financial bind, many teachers still support the strike because they see it as the only possible outcome to bring about real change.

“I voted for the unlimited general strike,” says Julie-Caroline Dumont, although the possibility that the conflict will drag on keeps her from sleeping. “We cannot accept the government’s offer, we have to stick together,” she said.

She complains that her kindergarten groups have been getting bigger and bigger for years, with small children with increasingly complex needs and without additional help in class to make everyday life easier.

  • Listen to Alexandre Dubé’s editorial on Benoit Dutrizac’s show via QUB radio :

Two years ago, one of her troubled students even broke her thumb when she tried to intervene, says Ms. Dumont.

“We are often overwhelmed, but despite everything, I still care about teaching and I don’t want to lose that passion. “But I need help to get there,” she says.

For her part, the president of the Autonomous Education Federation (FAE), Mélanie Hubert, recognizes that teachers in search of income “may turn to other professions” during the conflict, but hopes so “from the bottom of my heart.” As soon as the strike ends, they will teach again.

“It is up to the government to ensure that these people want to return to their classrooms after the agreement is signed,” she said.

Negotiations between the government and the FAE are still ongoing, but talks are progressing slowly and the gap remains wide, says Ms Hubert.

“The pace is not as sustainable as we would like and we would like to have productive discussions,” she said.

For its part, the Legault government said it was ready to improve its salary offer in exchange for flexibility on the part of the unions, with the aim of improving services to the population.

In collaboration with Anouk Lebel.

Strike calendar
daily

Tuesday

Joint Front Strike Day 1 of 3

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • 420,000 workers are affiliated to the CSN, the CSQ, the FTQ and the APTS. This front brings together employees from the health and education networks.
  • In schools, the Common Front represents support staff, specialists and 60% of teachers.
  • In CEGEPs, 85% of teachers are connected to the Common Front through the CSN.
  • In the health network, the Common Front represents not only office workers but also specialists and technicians.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of schools, CEGEPs, health and social services.
  • School and daycare classes are suspended in most school service centers in Quebec. Also closure of administrative centers.

OrPlanned events

  • A large demonstration is not planned.

Wednesday

Joint front strike day 2 of 3

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • 420,000 workers are affiliated to the CSN, the CSQ, the FTQ and the APTS. This front brings together employees from the health and education networks.
  • In schools and CEGEPs, the Common Front represents support staff, professionals and 60% of teachers.
  • In the health network, the Common Front represents not only office workers but also specialists and technicians.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of schools, CEGEPs, health and social services.
  • School and daycare classes are suspended in most school service centers in Quebec. Also closure of administrative centers.

OrPlanned events

  • A large demonstration is not planned.

THURSDAY

Joint front strike day 3 of 3

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • 420,000 workers are affiliated to the CSN, the CSQ, the FTQ and the APTS. This front brings together employees from the health and education networks.
  • In schools and CEGEPs, the Common Front represents support staff, professionals and 60% of teachers.
  • In the health network, the Common Front represents not only office workers but also specialists and technicians.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of schools, CEGEPs, health and social services.
  • School and daycare classes are suspended in most school service centers in Quebec. Also closure of administrative centers.

OrPlanned events

  • Planned rally in front of the National Assembly of Quebec between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
  • Demonstration from Collège Maisonneuve in Montreal from 10 a.m.

FIQ strike day 1 of 2

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • The Quebec Interprofessional Health Federation (FIQ) represents 80,000 nurses, practical nurses, respiratory therapists and clinical perfusionists.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of health and social care facilities.
  • In the health network, the strike is governed by essential services. Therefore, some treatments will be slowed down on certain units.
  • In addition, it is mandatory that 70% of operational services and 80% of services be maintained in subspecialty centers.

OrPlanned events

  • A large demonstration is not planned.

FAE general strike without borders

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • The Autonomous Education Federation (FAE) represents 66,000 teachers in Montreal, Quebec, Outaouais, the Laurentians, Estrie and Montérégie. This corresponds to 40% of teachers.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of schools
  • Suspension of classes for an indefinite period in the school service centers represented by the FAE. A return to class will only be possible if the union reaches an agreement in principle or makes significant progress at the negotiating table.

OrPlanned events

  • At 11:30 a.m. demonstration “for teachers and public schools” organized by the FAE in Jarry Park in Montreal.

Friday

FIQ strike day 2 of 2

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • The Quebec Interprofessional Health Federation (FIQ) represents 80,000 nurses, practical nurses, respiratory therapists and clinical perfusionists.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of health and social care facilities.
  • In the health network, the strike is governed by essential services. Therefore, some treatments will be slowed down on certain units.
  • In addition, it is mandatory that 70% of operational services and 80% of services be maintained in subspecialty centers.

OrPlanned events

  • A large demonstration is not planned.

FAE general strike without borders

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • The Autonomous Education Federation (FAE) represents 66,000 teachers in Montreal, Quebec, Outaouais, the Laurentians, Estrie and Montérégie. This corresponds to 40% of teachers.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Picketing in front of schools and CEGEPs
  • Suspension of classes for an indefinite period in the school service centers represented by the FAE. A return to class will only be possible if the union reaches an agreement in principle or makes significant progress at the negotiating table.

OrPlanned events

  • At 11:30 a.m. demonstration “for teachers and public schools” organized by the FAE in Jarry Park in Montreal.

SPGQ strike day 2 of 2

details

union

WHOWho is mobilized?

  • Some members of the Union of Professionals of the Government of Quebec (SPGQ), which represents 700 employees of ten CEGEPs, are on strike on November 23 and 24.

WhatDisturbances are to be expected

  • Classes are canceled in the following establishments: Cégep André-Laurendeau, Cégep de Jonquière, Cégep de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Cégep de Lanaudière, Cégep de Saint-Hyacinthe, Cégep de Sainte-Foy, Cégep de Thetford, Cégep de Trois-Rivières , Collège de Bois-de-Boulogne and Collège Montmorency.

OrPlanned events

  • A large demonstration is not planned.

Can you share information about this story?

Write to us or call us directly at 1 800-63SCOOP.


Posted

in

by